U.S. ABP & U.S. drones flying over Mexico detecting military drug/human trafficking camps

by Michael Webster: Syndicated Investigative Reporter. March 29,2011 at 6:00 PM PT.

 

http://www.americanborderpatrol.com/11-FEATURES/110319-FEATURE/SoldierRunning.jpg Mexican soldier running for cover

According to top law enforcement agents who want to remain anonymous tells that the Predators used to help spy on suspected drug traffickers have located Mexican army bases near the U.S. Mexican border where it is believed that the Mexican Army is evolved in the illegal drug trade as Mexico's largest and most dangerous drug cartel. Click or Google  Mexican Army corrupted and now largest Drug Cartel in Mexico  The Mexican Army is known to be corrupt and now is believed by many to be the biggest Mexican Drug Cartel of all. Most U.S. law-enforcement officials working alongside of  the Mexican Army and other Mexican law enforcement believe they are corrupt and very much involved in drug and human trafficking. Those same sources acknowledge the involvement at the highest levels of the Mexican military and lower level officers and the troops on the ground are being paid off by the other cartels and are  directly now trafficking in the lucrative narcotics and migrant smuggling business on a national bases.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has been surreptitiously flying Predator drones into Mexico for two years, helping Mexican authorities spy on suspected drug traffickers, According  to top law enforcement agents, who wish to remain nameless.

The border-security agency's surveillance flights, approved by Mexico but never announced by either country, predate occasional flights into Mexico by the U.S. Air Force's $38 million Global Hawk drone that began last month.

Mexico's National Security Council said in a statement Wednesday that unmanned aircraft have flown over Mexico on specific occasions, mainly along the border with the U.S., to gather information at the request of the Mexican government.

 

According to the Times the flights expand the U.S. role in the  drug war, in which Americans already have been training Mexican soldiers and police as well as cooperating on other intelligence.

Based on information found on the American Border Patrol web site it appears to confirm that Mexican Army camps were spotted from the air. The American Border Patrol in a March 15 aerial survey of the Arizona / Mexico border spotted a camp in Mexico that may involve the Mexican Army. The camp, only about 1/2 mile inside Mexico, consists of cleverly camouflaged "tents" that may house more than one hundred people waiting to cross the border. Most disturbing is a photograph of what appears to be an army soldier running for cover.
The camp was spotted accidentally when an American Border Patrol survey airplane drifted
slightly south of its normal course along the
border. (It is legal for ABP to fly in Mexico. It does this by filing a flight plan, giving Customs and Border Patrol radar its transponder code, and checking in with Customs when it lands in Yuma.)
Glenn Spencer, pilot of the surveillance airplane, said he drifted slightly south while entering data into his navigation system. "It was only the sharp eye of my still cameraman that led us to orbit the area and get some incredible photos," Spencer said. (See
these photos)
Spencer, who has been flying the border surveillance missions for five years, said he wonders how many other such camps could be found along the border and what involvement of the Mexican military there might be. "This camp would be very difficult to spot unless you were right on top of it at a low altitude," Spencer said.
Spencer had planned to brief an Arizona State Senate border committee on the threat, but
the head of the committee disinvited him.

 

"When these operations are carried out, they are always done with the authorization, oversight and supervision of national agencies, including the Mexican Air Force," the council said.

It said Mexico always defines the objectives, the information to be gathered and the specific tasks in which the drones will be used and insisted the operations respected Mexican law, civil and human rights.

The drones "have been particularly useful in achieving various objectives of combating crime and have significantly increased Mexican authorities' capabilities and technological superiority in its fight against crime," the council said.

The drones, which cost more than $10 million each, are equipped with cameras that can identify an object the size of a milk carton, provide real-time images to ground-control operators and can fly for more than 30 hours without having to refuel, according to the U.S. Congressional Research Service.

It is not clear what action the U.S. Government or the Mexican Government plan to do about this latest fixing information. Our American source said that the Mexican Army has always been unreliable and suspected of being involved in human and drug trafficking but these new development are going to have to be handle in a delicate manner.

The Global Hawk drone operations were first reported Wednesday by the New York Times, which said they began last month under an agreement between President Barack Obama and Mexico's leader, Felipe Calderon. AP's reporting found that similar operations using a different kind of drone have been going on since 2009.

Real Camouflage
These photos were taken by American Border Patrol last Tuesday. They show a camp just south of the border that is designed to be hidden from the air. A closer look found many people inside the cleverly designed “tents” - and one person who appears to be a soldier, running for cover. The amount of trash strewn nearby suggest that the site is used quite regularly by migrants heading north into the U.S. ABP found few U.S. Border Patrol in the area.

More Photos

 

 

 

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Mexican Army corrupted and now largest Drug Cartel in Mexico  By Michael Webster

 

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